Andrew J. Young

is nothing less than a living legend.

An icon of the Civil Rights movement,

he worked as executive director

of SCLC, the Southern Christian

Leadership Council,  where

he became a top strategist and trusted friend

to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and witnessed his assassination.

   In 1972, a predominately

white district in Georgia

elected Andrew Young as

its representative to the

United States Congress,

making him the first black

man to serve the state in

Washington since the

Reconstruction era.

   Andrew Young served in Congress for three

terms before being appointed United States

Ambassador to the United Nations by President

Jimmy Carter in 1977.

   In that role, he became a champion of human

rights around the world, and particularly in Africa,

where he spearheaded the administration's efforts

to end apartheid.

   In 1982, he was first elected Mayor of

Atlanta, and during two remarkable

terms is credited with transforming the city into an international metropolis.

   It was largely because of his

international influence that Atlanta was

chosen to host the Centennial Olympic

Games in 1996, which Ambassador

Young served as co-chairman.

   Since leaving public office,

Andrew Young has been

a sort of ambassador to

the world, devoting

much of his life's work to

Africa and its vast

economic potential.

Arguably, no one in

America knows the

continent and its people

so well.

You were given by God great gifts.

Many  people have gifts.

The test is what you do with them and whether you care about others who deserve their chance in life, who either don't have your gifts or didn't have your opportunities."

President Bill Clinton

   The Andrew J. Young Foundation was created

to help make his visions

for the planet a reality,

and he serves as

Chairman of this

non-profit organization.

  Andrew Young is  the author of three books, An Easy Burden, A Way Out of No Way, and The Making of Modern Atlanta.

 

   He has produced, co-written and narrated over 30 acclaimed documentaries, including Rwanda Rising, which was chosen to open the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles in 2007. 

Andrew Young is beaten while leading a non-violent march in St. Augustine, Florida, in 1964.

   Sought after as an advisor to world leaders,as a speaker on the lecture circuit, and a frequent commentator on CNN and other news channels, Ambassador Young is a keen observer of politics and world events.

 

   An ordained minister with the United Church of Christ for over six decades, he continues to preach and considers the work of the Andrew J. Young Foundation an extension of his ministry and of the Civil Rights movement itself.

THE LIFE & TIMES OF ANDREW YOUNG

LEGACY

 

© 2019 by the Andrew J. Young Foundation, Inc.